Because every American
should have access
to broadband Internet.

The Internet Innovation Alliance is a broad-based coalition of business and non-profit organizations that aim to ensure every American, regardless of race, income or geography, has access to the critical tool that is broadband Internet. The IIA seeks to promote public policies that support equal opportunity for universal broadband availability and adoption so that everyone, everywhere can seize the benefits of the Internet - from education to health care, employment to community building, civic engagement and beyond.

The Podium

Blog posts tagged with 'David Sutphen'

Wednesday, February 23

Chatting About the Digital Divide

By Brad

Earlier today, our own David Sutphen participated in an online chat at the Washington Post with Aaron Smith of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. The topic was the impact of the digital divide in America. Here’s a sample exchange:

Q: I understand the need to close the digital divide from the perspective of social good (education, participation in government, etc.), but does the private sector seem eager to develop this underserved market? Can we afford to wait on the profit motive to close the gaps in access and usage?

DAVID SUTPHEN: Closing the digital divide completely will require collaboration between private industry and government, which is one of the reasons the President announced an inititive in the State of the Union to help ensure that all Americans—regardless of geography, socie-economic or background—are connected. Changes to programs like the Universal Service Fund to make it more relevant to the broadband realities of today will also help.

The full chat is available at the Washington Post.

 

Thursday, February 10

Saving Money Through Adoption

By Brad

For the latest column in Fierce Telecom, our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen teamed up to write about the cost benefits of broadband adoption:

A recent financial analysis titled, “The Real Cost of the Digital Divide,” released by the Internet Innovation Alliance (IIA) and authored by Nicholas J. Delgado, certified financial planner and principal of Chicago-based wealth management firm Dignitas, found that American consumers can save $7,707 a year by having access to and using high-speed broadband Internet.

These savings on essentials like housing, food, clothing and basics like entertainment and travel come through discounts and sales only available to online consumers, in addition to the ability to price-comparison shop, as highlighted by a recent MSN Money story on the report. Broadband gives smart shoppers the tools to save large amounts of money, but it’s a bit like a treadmill: if you have one, it can really help you get in shape; if you hang your clothes on it, not so much.

Read the full column at Fierce Telecom.

 

Tuesday, February 08

Updating the Outdated

By Brad

Our Co-Chair David Sutphen has a piece in The Hill today on the important steps the FCC is taking today to finally modernize America’s telecommunications policies. Here’s a taste:

Every outdated and unnecessary regulation the FCC and other government agencies repeal has the potential to spur new investment, innovation and job creation. No one understands that more than the nation’s communications workers. Just ask the Communications Workers of America, which told Congress in mid-2010 that: “At a time of 10 percent unemployment – including layoffs in the telecom sector – workers in the industry cannot afford to see capital shifted from investment in advanced networks.”

President Obama has set out an ambitious goal, and Chairman Genachowski has begun to act. Let’s hope the call for smarter government doesn’t get dropped.

You can read the entire article at The Hill.

Tuesday, December 14

David Sutphen in Fierce Telecom

By Brad

In his latest column for Fierce Telecom, IIA Co-Chairman David Sutphen writes about how it’s time to embrace the compromise so we can finally move past the net neutrality debate:

The current FCC Order is a thoughtful and sincere effort on the part of Chairman Julius Genachowski to balance a multitude of priorities and sometimes conflicting interests. This is the first real middle-ground solution that will give the Commission the power it needs to preserve a truly open Internet. Anything else would likely have detrimental implications for communities that have been traditionally underserved by broadband technology.

You can read the full column at Fierce Telecom.

Wednesday, December 01

Statements From Our Co-Chairs

By Brad

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski deserves a lot of credit for proceeding so thoughtfully and choosing a commonsense compromise in the face of hyper-partisan brinksmanship. By finally turning the page on this issue, the FCC can now focus its attention on the National Broadband Plan and achieving universal access and adoption, as well as fostering broadband innovation and investment.

David Sutphen

We continue to see new regulations largely as a solution in search of a problem. However, today’s proposal seems to be the most effective option for reducing regulatory uncertainty in the broadband marketplace, enabling more widespread investment and deployment that will ultimately benefit consumers and our economy.

Bruce Mehlman

Tuesday, November 30

The Income Gap Online

By David

Despite recent gains, new research from Pew shows that America’s digital divide is still in place:

Analysis of several recent surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Projects finds key differences between those who live in households making $75,000 or more relative to those in lower-income households.

Some 95% of Americans who live in households earning $75,000 or more a year use the internet at least occasionally, compared with 70% of those living in households earning less than $75,000. Even among those who use the internet, the well-off are more likely than those with less income to use technology.

All the more reason for the FCC to move past the net neutrality distraction and re-focus on the National Broadband Plan.

Tuesday, November 23

It’s Time for Consensus on Net Neutrality

By IIA

Last week, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski called net neutrality regulations “one of the most important policies the country can adopt to improve broadband deployment.” Here are reactions to the statement from our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen:

The vast majority of economists, analysts and investors agree that new Internet regulations and policy uncertainty will deter investment, slow job creation and undermine broadband deployment. It’s time that we move beyond net neutrality — we can’t have excessive regulation if we hope to improve broadband deployment.

— Bruce Mehlman

NTIA just found that household broadband use in America rose sevenfold from 2001 to 2009 — hardly a market in crisis or in need of major new net neutrality regulations. And when thousands of offline citizens were asked why they have yet to adopt broadband, not one pointed to lack of more government net neutrality regulations as the reason. What we really need are policies that foster broadband adoption and lead to investment, job creation and economic opportunity. The common ground, consensus approach reflected in the Waxman bill remains the best framework for progress and compromise — anything beyond it, like regulating the wireless marketplace when there’s a spectrum scarcity, is a step in the wrong direction.

— David Sutphen

Thursday, November 18

Crossing Broadband Adoption Barriers

By Brad

On the heels of a recent Commerce Department study on current trends in broadband adoption, NextGenWeb interviewed our own David Sutphen about broadband adoption and closing the digital divide. Check it out.

Wednesday, November 17

A Conversation With TechCrunch — Part 7

By Brad

Our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen recently chatted with Andrew Keen from TechCrunch about last week’s election, the road ahead for the FCC, and how President Obama can “win back Silicon Valley.” The conversations have been broken up into a series, and TechCrunch has been kind enough to allow us to post them here throughout the week.

Here’s part seven, on how to solve the net neutrality debate:

Tuesday, November 16

A Conversation With TechCrunch — Part 6

By Brad

Our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen recently chatted with Andrew Keen from TechCrunch about last week’s election, the road ahead for the FCC, and how President Obama can “win back Silicon Valley.” The conversations have been broken up into a series, and TechCrunch has been kind enough to allow us to post them here throughout the week.

Here’s part six, on how to increase America’s rank in worldwide broadband:

Monday, November 15

A Conversation With TechCrunch — Part 5

By Brad

Our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen recently chatted with Andrew Keen from TechCrunch about last week’s election, the road ahead for the FCC, and how President Obama can “win back Silicon Valley.” The conversations have been broken up into a series, and TechCrunch has been kind enough to allow us to post them here throughout the week.

Here’s part five, which asks whether net neutrality advocates are against innovation:

Thursday, November 11

A Conversation With TechCrunch — Part 3

By Brad

Our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen recently chatted with Andrew Keen from TechCrunch about last week’s election, the road ahead for the FCC, and how President Obama can “win back Silicon Valley.” The conversations have been broken up into a series, and TechCrunch has been kind enough to allow us to post them here throughout the week.

Here’s part three, which touches on access as a civil rights issue and our recent report on the top 10 savings from broadband:

Wednesday, November 10

A Conversation With TechCrunch — Part 2

By Brad

Our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen recently chatted with Andrew Keen from TechCrunch about last week’s election, the road ahead for the FCC, and how President Obama can “win back Silicon Valley.” The conversations have been broken up into a series, and TechCrunch has been kind enough to allow us to post them here throughout the week.

Here’s part two:

Tuesday, November 09

A Conversation With TechCrunch — Part 1

By Brad

Our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen recently chatted with Andrew Keen from TechCrunch about last week’s election, the road ahead for the FCC, and how President Obama can “win back Silicon Valley.” The conversations have been broken up into a series, and TechCrunch has been kind enough to allow us to post them here throughout the week.

Here’s part one:

 

Thursday, November 04

Replying to the FCC

By IIA

Our response to the FCC’s call for reply comments in its Open Internet Public Notice on “Two Under-Developed Issues in the Open Internet Proceeding” has now been posted at the FCC website.

Statements from our Co-Chairs Bruce Mehlman and David Sutphen:

With Election Day behind us, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) stands at a pivotal crossroads. If it provides certainty to network operators and predictability to investors, it can meaningfully advance availability and adoption of high-speed Internet across the nation. If it rejects the counsel of bipartisan majorities in Congress and unilaterally pursues a more aggressive regulatory agenda, it can expect years of diminished investment, delayed re-employment in the telecom sector, battles in court and partisan squabbling that disserves our nation.

To realize 100 percent broadband availability at speeds that enable the next-generation of innovative applications, the FCC estimates the need for $350 billion in additional investment. Given the huge federal budget deficit and national debt, those investments are not going to come from the government. We need private investors to see the business case for continually upgrading existing networks and deploying competing infrastructure platforms.

— Bruce Mehlman

At a time when the nation is looking for common ground and common sense solutions for creating new jobs and fostering an economic recovery, the last thing we need is new regulations that threaten one of the few bright spots for growth: the broadband economy. Now is the time to turn the page on net neutrality and focus attention on the issues like universal service fund reform, digital literacy programs, and innovation policy, all of which will help to ensure that every American is benefiting from the broadband economy.

— David Sutphen

Thursday, October 28

When Chairmen Chat

By Brad

Via Multichannel News, current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and former Chair Michael Powell are scheduled to sit down to discuss all things broadband at a Rainbow/PUSH symposium “A More Perfect Union: Broad-Banding Together” this Friday in Washington DC. Sure to be on the docket: net neutrality, which Chairman Powell has long been against.

Among the panelists also scheduled to be taking part in the symposium is our very own Co-Chair David Sutphen.

Friday, October 22

IIA Video: David Sutphen at the AMP Summit

By Brad

At last month’s AMP Summit, our Co-Chair David Sutphen discussed broadband distribution and its effect on job creation.

Thursday, October 21

Pick Up Where Waxman Left Off

By Brad

In his latest column for Fierce Telecom, our Co-Chair David Sutphen encourages Congress to pick up where Rep. Waxman left off with his net neutrality bill:

Although the Waxman bill did not arrive at its intended destination—the House floor—the progress made proves that a compromise for what seemed to be a deadlock debate can be reached. Congress should take action on Title II, as it’s now clear that a legislative solution is possible and consensus exists.

Both the FCC decision and Waxman effort bring us closer to meeting the objectives set forth by the National Broadband Plan. Freeing up white spaces paves the way for “super WiFi,” which will likely help extend wireless broadband access to unserved and underserved people in rural and urban communities. It also gives entrepreneurs and engineers room to run. Waxman’s bill showed that, collectively, we can settle the net neutrality debate and move on to goals that mean something to every American, such as job creation and affordable access to broadband.  Now is not the time to wipe the slate clean and revert to calls for Title II; now is the time for Congress to pick up where Waxman left off.

Check out the entire column at Fierce Telecom.

Tuesday, October 12

On “Specialized” Services and Wireless Services

By IIA

Statements from our Co-Chairs David Sutphen and Bruce Mehlman regarding the FCC’s “Open Internet” inquiry on mobile wireless services and “specialized” services:

Unlike burdensome and unnecessary Title II regulations, allowing specialized services can benefit consumers, investors and innovators. Enhancing quality of service (QoS) or enabling the connection of devices like wireless smart meters and health monitors will complement the open Internet, enhancing its speed and quality by channeling traffic with special needs.

— David Sutphen

We must take care that the near theological debate over ‘net neutrality’ not detract from a collective focus on expanding the Internet’s reach and utility. The Commission should abandon its ambitions to regulate wireless services, as new rules on mobile platforms are unnecessary at this time and could undermine investment, innovation and adoption in the most thriving and successful corner of the broadband ecosystem.

If achieving universal broadband access and adoption is the primary objective, the FCC should carefully consider the impact new regulations would have on the future expansion of network infrastructure. Allowing business model flexibility – both by allowing ‘managed’ services and keeping the wireless space unfettered – is key to encouraging the investment needed to connect every American with the benefits of high-speed Internet.

— Bruce Mehlman

IIA’s full reply comment is available at the FCC’s website (PDF).

IIA in the News: David Sutphen Named by The Root

By Brad

Online magazine The Root has published its annual “Root 100” list, a selection of people who “represent the ideals of The Root.” Among those named this year: NBA star LeBron James, musician Wyclef Jean, actor and Tony Award winner Viola Davis… and our very own Co-Chairman David Sutphen.

From The Root’s write-up about the list:

Sutphen exploits his rich background in politics, media and law to help shape the national policy debate on regulating the Internet. An attorney with the Brunswick Group, he also serves as co-chairman of the Internet Innovation Alliance, a coalition of media businesses, nonprofits and other stakeholders committed to establishing America’s rules of the road regarding the Web. Before his current roles, Sutphen served as a senior executive at Viacom, chief of staff for former Rep. Harold Ford, as Sen. Edward Kennedy’s general counsel and an attorney for the Recording Industry Association of America.

Congratulations David!

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