Because every American
should have access
to broadband Internet.

The Internet Innovation Alliance is a broad-based coalition of business and non-profit organizations that aim to ensure every American, regardless of race, income or geography, has access to the critical tool that is broadband Internet. The IIA seeks to promote public policies that support equal opportunity for universal broadband availability and adoption so that everyone, everywhere can seize the benefits of the Internet - from education to health care, employment to community building, civic engagement and beyond.

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IIA Broadband Fact Book

Broadband Fact Book

Here you'll find convenient research items culled from the best broadband data sources. If you need to find bite-sized talking points on a tight deadline, you're in the right place. We've already done the hard part for you!

Research Area Broadband Traffic

Cameras probably will be the most important factor in generating new Net traffic.

Consumers purchased more than 1 billion mobile phones around the globe in 2006.  Of these billion phones sold in 2006, more than 400 million were camera phones.

At least 700 million camera phones will be sold in 2009. By 2009, consumers will buy more than 100 million compact digital cameras—generating files of around 3 MB per photo—and 6 million high-end DSLR cameras—generating photos of 20 MB or more.

The mobile revolution means more people will be connected to the Net more of the time. iPhones, Treos, and Blackberries are not phones or PDAs—they are network computers.

We can now consume and produce rich content anywhere, anytime. Over the coming decade, we will tag just about every item everywhere with tiny RFID sensors.

Tags:

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

One HD film (motion picture) amounts to about 10 GB of data.

With HD, NetFlix today would ship 5.8 exabytes of DVDs each year. HD movie downloads and streams could generate 100 exabytes per year, or around 10x today’s U.S. Internet.

Tags: broadband traffic, exaflood, exabytes

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

Amateurs capture some 10 exabytes of video each year.

Conversion of amateur video capture to HD would mean 100 exabytes per year, or 10 times today’s annual U.S. Internet traffic.

Tags:

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

Cisco’s new HD Telepresence system requires a symmetrical 15 Mbps connection. Just 75 of these Telepresence calls would generate as much traffic as the entire Internet in 1990.

Tags:

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

A move to video-phones would mean an increase of 300 exabytes, or 30x the size of the existing U.S. Internet.

Tags: broadband traffic, video

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

By mid-2007, MSN Video Messenger was already generating 4 PB per month, or as much as the entire Internet in 1997.

Tags:

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

30 exabytes of telephone traffic are transmitted globally each year.

Tags: broadband traffic, exaflood, pc

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

By mid-2007, YouTube was streaming around 50 petabytes per month, or 600 petabytes (PB) per year.

This was approximately ~7% of all U.S. Internet traffic. All original broadcast and cable TV and radio content totals around 75 PB per year. A Hi-Def YouTube would mean 12 exabytes per year.

Tags:

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

In 1991, $500 bought 100 megabytes worth of hard drive storage.

Today, some $300 buys a terabyte drive. In a decade and a half, digital storage technology has thus advanced by a factor of more than 10,000.

Tags:

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.

The first phase of the Internet, starting with Arpanet in 1969, was a small research project that linked together a few, and then a few thousand, scientists.

In the mid-1990s the second broad phase delivered the Internet to the masses with e-mail, graphical browsers, and the World Wide Web.
Third phase is underway; video over the Net portends innumerable consumer and commercial possibilities.

Tags: broadband traffic, exaflood, video, applications, pc

Swanson, Bret and George Gilder. Estimating the Exaflood. (Seattle, WA: Discovery Institute). January, 2008.
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