Because every American
should have access
to broadband Internet.

The Internet Innovation Alliance is a broad-based coalition of business and non-profit organizations that aim to ensure every American, regardless of race, income or geography, has access to the critical tool that is broadband Internet. The IIA seeks to promote public policies that support equal opportunity for universal broadband availability and adoption so that everyone, everywhere can seize the benefits of the Internet - from education to health care, employment to community building, civic engagement and beyond.

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factbook

Broadband Fact Book

Here you'll find convenient research items culled from the best broadband data sources. If you need to find bite-sized talking points on a tight deadline, you're in the right place. We've already done the hard part for you!

Facts tagged with Connectivity

Currently, 63 percent of adults have broadband at home, compared to just 7 percent who use dial-up connections, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: broadband adoption, comparison, accessibility, connectivity, dial-up, high-speed, percentages

Daniel Vock, “States weigh in as feds prepare to spend billions on broadband for remote areas,” Stateline.org. August 11, 2009.

47% of Americans have laptops, and wireless is by and large the norm for internet access. 

Some 80% of laptop users have connected to the internet using a wireless network such as WiFi and 37% have used a longer range wireless broadband connection such as an AirCard.  81% of laptop users have connected wirelessly using one of those means. 

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: broadband adoption, wi-fi, accessibility, connectivity, dial-up, percentage, high-speed, aircard

Pew Internet & American Life Project, “Wireless Internet Use,” April 2009.

The U. S. is making tremendous progress in getting homes connected to broadband, moving from 55 percent of homes last year in a Pew survey to 63% this year. 

Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed by Pew said they had more than three choices in broadband providers.

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: broadband adoption, network infrastructure, pew, research, comparison, accessibility, connectivity

Link Hoewing, “More Thoughts on NYT’s Mischaracterized Facts About an EU Report,” Verizon Policy Blog. August 7, 2009.

40 percent of households in the United States still don’t have broadband, and the percentages are even lower when you look at just rural areas.

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: rural, broadband adoption, underserved, unserved, accessibility, connectivity

Chris O’Brien, “Time to move broadband discussion to front burner,” San Jose Mercury News. August 4, 2009.

It is estimated that 8 percent to 10 percent of the nation’s hinterland households do not have access to high-speed Internet service.

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: rural, broadband adoption, accessibility, connectivity, high-speed

Bob Fernandez, “New head of FCC sets a different course,” Philadelphia Inquirer. July 30, 2009.

According to an April 2009 survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, 53 percent of African Americans said accessing information wirelessly is very important, and 22 percent said the same for sharing or posting. For Hispanics, the answers were respectively 54 and 24 percent.

Research Area: Broadband Traffic

Tags: broadband traffic, mobile, iphone, smartphone, accessibility, connectivity, blackberry, percentage, mobile device, race

Matthew Lasar, “Pew: minorities embrace internet via handheld devices,” Ars Tecnica. July 26, 2009.

50 percent of respondents in an April 2009 survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project told researchers that wireless internet is “very important” because “I can stay easily in touch with other people.”

Research Area: Broadband Traffic

Tags: broadband traffic, mobile, iphone, smartphone, accessibility, connectivity, blackberry, percentage, mobile device, blog

Matthew Lasar, “Pew: minorities embrace internet via handheld devices,” Ars Tecnica. July 26, 2009.

Applications for part of the broadband stimulus money will be judged on a point system. 

Broadband proposals win more points for reaching the most users with the greatest speed and affordability. Points also are given for public service, such as providing broadband to a hospital. The rules also favor projects that are “shovel ready,” because all projects must be substantially finished within two years of receiving federal money.

Research Area: Stimulus

Tags: broadband adoption, stimulus, economy, network infrastructure, accessibility, connectivity

Steve Alexander, “Rules called obstacle to funding for broadband...,” Star-Tribune. July 24, 2009.

A report found that nearly half of all African-Americans and English-speaking Hispanics (the study did not include a Spanish-language option) were using mobile phones or other hand-held devices to surf the Web and send e-mail messages.

By comparison, just 28 percent of white Americans reported ever going online using a mobile device.

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: broadband adoption, iphone, digital literacy, smartphone, accessibility, connectivity, age, blackberry, race, mobile phone

Jenna Wortham, “Mobile Internet Use Shrinks Digital Divide,” New York Times Bits. July 22, 2009.

In 2008, 88 percent of high income households (income greater than $100,000 per year) were connected to broadband, while only 41 percent of low-income households (income less than $25,000 per year) had adopted it.

Research Area: Broadband Adoption

Tags: broadband adoption, economy, income, digital literacy, demographics, accessibility, connectivity, orszag, access gap

Mark Dutz, Jonathan Orszag, Robert Willig, “The Substantial Consumer Benefits of Broadband Connectivity for U.S. Households,” CompassLexecon and the Internet Innovation Alliance. July 2009.
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