General

In a new article for Forbes, Fred Campbell, director of Tech Knowledge and former head of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), brings to light yet another example of regulatory overreach, compliments of the FCC. The Commission intends to marry broadband with…batteries? In short, broadband providers would be required to redesign cable and DSL modems to have bigger backup batteries that would allow web surfing for up to 8 hours during a power outage – IF you also have backup power for your computer and/or other devices that you use to access the web.

As Campbell points out, the Commission’s thought process might as well have been born in the 20th century and doesn’t make sense for a number of reasons. Here are the top three:

First, this directive would take choice out of the hands of consumers. Forget having a say about whether or how you want to implement a backup power solution.

Second, it’s unnecessary. A power outage doesn’t prevent mobile devices from being used to connect during an emergency, from calling 911 to texting friends and family. In real-world testing, a mobile phone can run for at least 35 hours with low and mixed usage. And, as Campbell describes, if you use your broadband modem to make phone calls, the FCC’s rules already require your broadband provider to offer you a backup power battery for voice calls – that 97% of Comcast XFINITY voice service customers decline, by the way.

Third, consumers – despite demonstrating (through an extremely low take-rate) little interest in backup power for broadband – will be forced to foot the bill for this extravagance in the end…for your “protection.” Big Brother knows best?

Head on over to Forbes and read Campbell’s full piece for more details about why the FCC’s reasoning on backup battery power for broadband doesn’t add up.