Press Releases

WASHINGTON, D.C. – June 17, 2011 – Many false and uninformed mischaracterizations regarding AT&T’s proposed purchase of T-Mobile were entered into the record for competitive or ideological reasons in the first set of public comments submitted to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), according to the Internet Innovation Alliance (IIA), a broad-based coalition supporting broadband access and adoption for all Americans, particularly increased mobile connectivity for underserved and rural communities. The Alliance filed reply comments that dispel seven myths about the AT&T/T-Mobile merger:

MYTH 1: The merger would be bad for broadband competition.   
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would enhance competition for broadband services.

MYTH 2: The merger would disserve rural communities.
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would give 55 million more Americans access to LTE broadband services than the status quo.

MYTH 3: The merger would be bad for wireless prices and competition.
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would continue a decade-long trend of falling wireless prices, expanding services and robust competition.

MYTH 4: The merger would reduce investment in broadband infrastructure and cut jobs.
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would increase infrastructure investment by $8 billion for starters.

MYTH 5: The merger would undermine innovators and web-based entrepreneurs.
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would meaningfully enhance the advanced wireless infrastructure so essential to next-generation mobile services.

MYTH 6: The merger would maintain the persistent “digital divide.”
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would accelerate the pace with which smart phones and wireless services are reducing race-and-diversity-based gaps in broadband adoption and usage.

MYTH 7: The merger would be bad for wireless consumers’ quality of service.
REALITY: Combining AT&T and T-Mobile would be the best thing that could happen for wireless consumers’ quality of service.

To view supporting information for all seven “realities,” read the IIA’s filing with the FCC: http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs/document/view?id=7021687968.

“Any reasonable application of the public interest standard will find AT&T’s proposed merger with T-Mobile to be a win-win,” said IIA Founder and Co-Chairman Bruce Mehlman. “The deal expands broadband availability, increases investment, enhances network capacity and better serves those historically disenfranchised by lack of options in rural areas and communities of color.”